Monthly Archives: August 2016

How HR Department To Manage Employee Induction

One of the primary reasons changes to a company’s employee induction may not get done is simply because it can be a bit of a task to actually make the changes in the first place. It can also be very costly. Making changes may involve printing new booklets, editing videos, contacting (and relying on) a third party provider, or fighting for IT department attention. And because there is an employee induction up and running, the status quo is often enough to satisfy the over-worked HR department.

Why it has to get done
An employee induction is your first, and one of your primary, tools for educating staff on the specific characteristics of your workplace safety. The simplest change to procedure can have disastrous results if your staff is unaware of it.
For example: If an emergency exit is changed, for any reason, and the induction does not reflect this change, any employees inducted between the time current staff members were informed (by other means) and the time of hire, they will have the wrong information.
This may sound a bit far-fetched, but it’s just one of thousands of changes that can happen in a workplace. And it should always be assumed that every piece of information in an induction is there for good reason.

How to do it simply
When your employee induction management system enables you to control course content simply, you are much more likely to actually do it. When you can spend 5 minutes doing something yourself, rather than hours (even days) trying to get someone else to do it, you’ll just do it!
Not too many systems will enable you to control your own course content. Induction systems that enable you to deliver courses online are probably your best bet. Try a simple Google search for “employee inductions” or “online inductions” and take a look at what you find. There are some great solutions out there, just make sure it gives you control over your content!

Help your team attain its goal

As a team leader/manager you need to make your team “the best” among other teams. As a leader you need to encourage your team with motivating words. Even the criticism should be such that they don’t feel discouraged to work further. Instead they should be able to strive ahead to achieve their goal.

Be heard among your team members

Develop excellent communicating skills so that you can convey the actual message to your subordinates. Be simple and clear from the start so that there remains no place for doubt. Ask your team members to come to you repeatedly for clarification. Ask them in return given a chance how they will try to achieve the set goal. They will feel encouraged and happy.

Encourage your team to trust you

Your team should trust you enough to confide in you. You should always be there for them when they want to share anything with you. This will increase the understanding between you and your team. As a leader of the team, you need to make certain that they like what you are doing for them to be satisfied and contented.
Again in the process of sharing things with them, do not encourage them to disclose any grapevine gossip.

Incorporate friendship with your team members

As a manager or leader, if you stay unapproachable and keep a wall around you, you will be creating a barrier between yourself and your team members. There should never be a huge gap between you and your team. As a good leader you should incorporate friendship and camaraderie.

Positive Reinforcement

Let your employees know that their efforts will always be recognized and will be treated as true accomplishments in the company. A token gift, a certificate, a scribble of encouragement in the whiteboard or even sticking a post-it on their cubicle wall will work wonders.
Make sure to reward the entire group once a project has successfully commenced. Take them out to team lunch or give them small tokens like gift coupons.

Happy Employees

Always try to determine whether your team members are happy with their job or not. The performance of an unhappy or dissatisfied employee will never be up to the mark. Create a positive energy among your employees. This will come once they are truly happy and well encourage in their work.

Want to know more about the tips & secrets to becoming a motivational leader in the cut-throat corporate world so that you can motivate your slacking team to become more responsive and productive?

Leadership mentoring programs is one of simple way to be a leader

Many organizations have discovered providing a mentor for high performing employees not only helps them settle into their job and company environment, but also contributes to a lower employee turnover rate and greater job satisfaction.

A mentor, basically, is someone who serves as a counselor or guide. Being asked to serve as a mentor is an honor. It indicates the company has faith in the person’s abilities and trusts him or her to have a positive impact on the situation. The use of a mentor may be an informal, short-term situation or a more formal, long-term assignment.

In an informal mentoring program, the mentor usually helps the mentee for a limited period of time. Advice from the mentor may include the most basic of information about everyday routines including tips about “do’s and don’ts” not found in the employee manual to helping the employee learn job responsibilities and prepare them for future roles in the organization. A mentor who is available to answer questions and provide leadership development also saves time for the supervisor or manager. In addition, mentees often feel more comfortable asking questions of their mentor than their supervisor.

In a program of this type, mentors often are volunteers. Forcing someone who does not want to serve as a mentor to do so can quickly create problems. Obviously, someone with a negative attitude, who might encourage a new employee to gripe and complain, should not serve as a mentor.

A more formal version corporate mentoring program occurs when an organization appoints a senior manager with extensive knowledge and experience to serve as a mentor to a professional the company feels has excellent potential for growth. The mentor’s role usually lasts for an extended period of time.

Effective mentoring programs must have senior level support from the beginning, otherwise it will fail to get the attention and support it needs to become part of the organization’s culture. Experience shows the most effective mentoring programs are run by senior level executives, not just the human resources department.

Whether informal or formal, both parties need to understand the parameters. These may be more important in a long-term, formal mentoring situation, but can also influence the success of short-term, informal mentoring.

  • Select the right mentor. Not everyone makes a good mentor. A mentor is someone who is respected, successful and understands the culture of the organization. They must be willing to make a commitment of their time and knowledge.
  • Ensure proper pairing and create an emotional bond. It is helpful to conduct a behavioral assessment on both the mentee and mentor. This insures proper matching and helps both parties understand each other’s communication styles, strengths and limitations.
  • Establish goals and a purpose. The mentor needs to outline these areas at the beginning. The goals should be in alignment with the strategic plan. Just as important, the protégé should outline their objectives as well.
  • The mentor’s role is to coach and advise the mentee. The mentor does not interfere with the supervisor or manager’s decisions. The new employee, while expected to seek the mentor’s advice particularly on critical issues, is not bound to accept that advice.
  • Confidentiality is important. Both parties need to feel confident that discussions remain between them–not immediately relayed to a supervisor or manager.
  • Decide in advance how you will communicate. Will you have regularly scheduled meetings? Will discussion be face-to-face, over the telephone or even via e-mail?
  • Both parties need to make their preferences known at the beginning and reach an acceptable compromise if they are different.
  • Discuss time limits. If the mentoring period has a time limit the mentor should state that at the beginning.
  • Discuss time commitments. Again, this may be more critical for long-term, formal mentoring. The mentor must expect to give the employee adequate time, but the newcomer should not expect excessive amounts. Setting a schedule at the beginning (example: meet once a week the first month, then once a month after that) avoids irritating misunderstandings later.
  • Build openness and respect. Both the mentor and the person being mentored need to be open and honest, yet respect the other. A mentor who withholds important information or comments does not contribute to the other person’s success. However,
  • such feedback should be delivered with tact and courtesy–and (even if somewhat hurtful) received with an open mind.
  • Establish a professional relationship. The relationship between the mentor and his or her protégé is a professional one, not a personal one. This is particularly important for the mentee to understand.

Source : http://www.chartcourse.com/

School children in Atlanta experiencing a crisis of leadership

School is a place where children – children not only gain knowledge, but also to build self-reliance and confidence. So what if the opposite is happening in schools in Atlanta.  A regional accrediting agency has proclaimed the Clayton County Atlanta schools district as needing a complete change in leadership to have any hope of retaining its accreditation. The CEO of the Atlanta based Southern Association of Colleges and Schools has issued a terse notice that the Clayton County Atlanta schools can expect to have their accreditation removed by September 1st if drastic changes are not implemented.

Discrediting is Disastrous

Discrediting would be disastrous for this member of Atlanta schools district. It would throw into jeopardy all avenues of federal funding for the schools and throw a question mark over a students eligibility to be accepted into colleges. Scholarships would also be affected.

Its not often that the agency strips an Atlanta school of its accreditation. In fact, in the past 10 years only one school district has had accreditation stripped away. No Atlanta school has ever had accreditation stripped away. If the move goes through and it will, unless members of the schools board put aside their personal agendas and focus on the larger picture it will be the first time a Georgia school has slipped though the cracks.

The step to remove accreditation of Clayton County Atlanta schools has led to frantic efforts by Clayton County lawmakers, students groups and the Georgia chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored Persons. These groups along with worried parents have been calling for all members of Clayton Countys board to resign with immediate effect to ensure that this Atlanta school district does not skip though the cracks and take its student body with it.

Atlanta Schools Students Will Suffer

Problems at this Atlanta schools district involve everything from corruption among members of the board, to a shoddily designed curriculum thats not benefiting students. Teacher morale is also reported to be low at this Atlanta schools district, and thats hardly a surprise. You cant expect to teachers to be highly motivated when one member of the school board fires a football coach for not handing over a game film featuring her child, while another board member lives it up at a hotel with school money.

The crisis at Clayton County schools has led to tensions between members of the school board and the public. At a recent board meting, visitors were made to pass through metal detectors and a police helicopter hovered overhead.

Its a sad state of affairs that a member of the Atlanta schools district has let down its students so badly. Students at these Atlanta schools risk having their futures in jeopardy if the move to strip Clayton County schools of accreditation does succeed.